Happy Easter!

Posted April 20, 2014 by Sue Klejeski
Categories: Uncategorized

Heart of the Lesson: Divine Mercy Sunday

Posted April 19, 2014 by Sue Klejeski
Categories: Sue's Suggestions

divine mercy

Divine Mercy Sunday always falls on the first Sunday after Easter.  This year it also happens to be the day when two former Popes are canonized: John XXIII and John Paul II (which is, of course, completely fitting since it was John Paul II who established this feast).

The idea behind this celebration is that we cannot begin to imagine the depths of God’s mercy, but like a good father, He wants to help us understand.  To do this, He gave a series of messages to a Polish nun, Sr. Faustina Kowalska, and told her to write them down for everyone to study.

Think of this lesson as a super-condensed, beginner version of this message.J

hamburgerThere are two activities with this lesson, one very silly and memorable, the other very prayerful and also memorable.  For the silly one, look ahead in the lesson for details and be prepared to help your younger kids with cutting if that kind of thing tends to bog them down.  Oh, and you may want to consider serving hamburgers with all the fixings for dinner that day.  Really, it would be a great review and food is a fantastic motivator.

 

For the more prayerful activity, we’ve provided an audio for your family to pray along with.  The chaplet of Divine Mercy is similar in structure to the Rosary, but the prayers are shorter so it takes less time, overall.  An added benefit is that this month’s memory verse is one of the prayers from the Chaplet, so even if you pray along only once, you’ll hear that prayer several times and it will be easier to memorize.

Oh, Minnesota!

Posted April 17, 2014 by Sue Klejeski
Categories: Uncategorized

Just one more reason why we always bury the Alleluia indoors around here!

april snow

Collect from the Mass of the Lord’s Supper

Posted April 17, 2014 by Sue Klejeski
Categories: Uncategorized

Collect (KAH-lehkt): Also know as the “Opening Prayer,” a formal prayer, usually addressed to the Father, through the Son, and in the Holy Spirit, by which the introductory rites are brought to a close and the assembly is prepared for the Liturgy of the Word.

O God, who have called us to participate in this most sacred Supper, in which your Only Begotten Son, when about to hand himself over to death, entrusted to the Church a sacrifice new for all eternity, the banquet of his love, grant, we pray, that we may draw from so great a mystery, the fullness of charity and of life.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Last Supper - Tina

Collect from today’s Mass

Posted April 16, 2014 by Sue Klejeski
Categories: Uncategorized

Collect (KAH-lehkt): Also know as the “Opening Prayer,” a formal prayer, usually addressed to the Father, through the Son, and in the Holy Spirit, by which the introductory rites are brought to a close and the assembly is prepared for the Liturgy of the Word.

O God, who willed your Son to submit for our sake to the yoke of the Cross, so that you might drive from us the power of the enemy, grant us, your servants, to attain the grace of the resurrection.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit.  

Crucifixion - Tina

Collect from today’s Mass

Posted April 15, 2014 by Sue Klejeski
Categories: Uncategorized

Collect (KAH-lehkt): Also know as the “Opening Prayer,” a formal prayer, usually addressed to the Father, through the Son, and in the Holy Spirit, by which the introductory rites are brought to a close and the assembly is prepared for the Liturgy of the Word.

Almighty ever-living God, grant us so to celebrate the mysteries of the Lord’s Passion that we may merit to receive your pardon.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Crucifixion - Tina

 

Collect from today’s Mass

Posted April 14, 2014 by Sue Klejeski
Categories: Uncategorized

Collect (KAH-lehkt): Also know as the “Opening Prayer,” a formal prayer, usually addressed to the Father, through the Son, and in the Holy Spirit, by which the introductory rites are brought to a close and the assembly is prepared for the Liturgy of the Word.

Grant, we pray, almighty God, that, though in our weakness we fail, we may be revived through the Passion of your Only Begotten Son.  Who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.Crucifixion - Tina


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